Disclaimer

This is dementia. It's not just a memory problem.
What you read in this blog is purely my own personal experience in dealing with Lewy Body Dementia every day.

This is not meant to offer any medical or legal advise.
I have no professional training in care giving or experiences in formal writing.
I'm just a woman that loves her husband deeply and wants to provide him with the best quality of life he can and chooses to have.
My prayer though this is "Lord, What am I learning from this; how can I use it help someone else and to glorify You?"
If just one person finds comfort in this public blog. I will feel like it was a success.

Friday, June 28, 2013

June 28 2013

Today didn't go very well. Much like many of the days and nights lately.
We are struggling.
I miss my husband even though he is sitting in the same room with me.

5 comments:

  1. I wish I could hug you. I'm right there with you.....

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  2. Can't hug you from Japan - but virtually can :-)

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  3. First time I have ever commented.I found your blog late May and read it from the begining. You gave me the courage to deal with Dad and understand what he was going through. Dad was diagnosed with LBD in January, he was already at stage 6 by our reckoning. Mum died 5 years ago so no one was close enough to take real notice of the decline in his mental capacity until it hit us in the face. He had hidden it very well. Dad missed Mum greatly, all he wanted was to join her. On the 15th of June he finally got his wish. Dad caught a cold and it turned into pheumonia. The LBD had robbed us of our dad in the cruellest way, he was aware of his family, yet not know where he was or who we were. When he became ill the choice was to hopitalise him on a respirated with no guarantees he would recover or go palliative and let him go in peace. The father we knew and loved had left us a long time ago. All he craved for was his beloved wife. His future was bleak the LBD was detroying what little of him was left. As a family we made the decision to give him what he wanted. Peace in Mum's loving arms once more. Kathy, our brief journey with LBD is over, yours is now coming to an extremely rough time. Know that you have touched people around the world with your loving care of Hubby. May you draw strength from the knowledge that in Australia I will be praying for you.

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  4. How are you doing/??? are you ok???? I've never met you - but thru this strange thing called Blogging....we find ourselves wondering about people we've never met and hoping they are ok and finding strength to get thru the days.

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  5. Just found your blog. My husband was recently diagnosed as LBD, although he had been in decline for over two years following a TIA. What struck me in your story is the similarity to mine. My husband is 22 years older than I, and I am his fourth wife. We have had many similar episodes to yours. Trying to exit the moving vehicle, not knowing who I was, not recognizing the house we built and wanting to leave, living in the past, getting weaker and every day not knowing if things will be good, or not so good. Thank you for your story. It does not make life easier, but does bring a better perspective to what is happening. Best wishes to you in your journey.

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